Recent Posts

Archive

Tags

Why Title Matters


Real estate can take on different forms of ownership depending upon the number of parties and the unique circumstances involved. Understanding how your real estate is owned, or “titled,” is necessary because this determines the extent of control you have over your real estate, how susceptible your property is to creditors, and what will happen to it upon your death. Below are some of the common ways in which real estate is owned.

Individually

One of the most common ways people own real estate is individually. As the sole owner, you have full control over the real estate. You can transfer it to anyone and can mortgage it. However, although the bankruptcy code offers some protections for personal residences, should you have creditor issues, the real estate could be vulnerable to being taken to satisfy debts or creditors’ claims. Additionally, at your death, the real estate will be transferred to the individual(s) named in your will (or trust) or according to state law, both of which will require probate court involvement to transfer ownership to your heirs. This can be a time-consuming, public, and expensive process for your loved ones (especially if the real estate is very valuable).

Tenants in Common

When several people own real estate as tenants in common, the entire property is owned by the group, meaning that no one person can claim ownership of a specific portion of it. Yet the ownership does not have to be equal. One person can own a 25% interest (i.e. “share”) while the other has a 75% ownership interest. Each co-owner is free to transfer or mortgage their interest as they wish. However, the more co-owners, the higher the possibility for creditor issues. Although creditors can only collect from the co-owner that owes them money, they may be able to force a sale of the real estate to satisfy their claim. Upon a co-owner’s passing, their ownership interest will transfer to whomever the co-owner has specified in the owner’s will or by state law if no estate plan was prepared. Both options require the real estate to go through the probate process to transfer ownership to the co-owner’s heirs.

Joint Tenancy

For this type of ownership, also known as “joint tenancy with right of survivorship,” two or more individuals own an equal and undivided interest (share) in the real estate. When one of the owners dies, their interest automatically passes to the remaining co-owners, and the survivor(s) continue to own the real estate. Each co-owner is able to transfer their interest to another person, but the new co-owner does not become a joint tenant (with right of survivorship) but rather a tenant in common (whose interest does not automatically transfer to the survivi